Locomotion


The talapoin monkey moves through the forest quadrupedally (Fleagle, 1988). This species also moves through the forest by leaping and can also swim (Fleagle, 1988).

Wolfheim and Rowell (1972) describe the following locomotor patterns for the talapoin monkey:

This is a description of the general body postures of the talapoin monkey:
sit: This is where an individual is sitting on its ischial callosities with the back bowed, the knees flexed sharply, the shoulders relaxed, and the feet resting flat o the substrate (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). The head is held between the shoulders with the arms usually found inside the hind limbs (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This is the most common posture for the talapoin monkey, occurring in watching, grooming, eating, and sleeping (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

erect sit: This is a variation on sit where the back is straight, shoulders are raised, and the head held above the shoulders as opposed to between them (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This posture can occur when an individual sees a disturbing stimulus (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

heel sit: This is where an individual will have the feet flat but the ischial callosities will not touch the ground and the arms are between the knees (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). From this posture an individual may easily run or jump and this posture is seen as a short stop during chases, avoidances, and other occurrences of tension (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

cringe: This is where an individual sits on its heels or bowed with the head lowered slightly and the shoulders hunched (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This posture is one oriented away from another conspecific (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This posture occurs when one individual is grasps the hair on the forehead roughly or is grooming on the face (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This posture is followed by avoidance behavior and may be a submissive posture (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

hunched sit: This is the sit posture with the elbows close to the body and knees positioned under the chin (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This posture is seen when the temperature is cold or when individuals have just been harassed by one or more conspecifics (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

solitary huddle: This is a variation on sit where the knees are held close to the body, the head down to the knees or between the legs, and the arms positioned at the sides or around the knees (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This posture is especially used by males and is used when individuals are avoiding contact with other members of the group (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

sitting together: This is when two to four individuals will sit together, usually not touching but occasionally will have one or both arms around each other or have the tail entwined (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This posture is used during sleeping (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

quadrupedal stand: This is where an individual stands on all four legs and it is seen during brief stops, before sitting or walking, and when looking intently at an object (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

flexed stand: This is when an individual is standing in a tense manner having the hind limbs flexed strongly with the body almost parallel to the horizontal substrate (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This posture is seen in times of uncertainty (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

lunge: This is when one individual while sitting or standing and having the hind limbs remain stationary throws the head and torso towards another individual (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). The individual adopting this posture may grab at the other conspecific and this is seen as a aggressive posture (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

bipedal stand: This is when an individual stand upright on the hind feet and this posture is rarely seen (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This posture is seen more by juveniles than by adults (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

lying down: This is when an individual is resting parallel on the horizontal substrate, either on the side, supine, or prone (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972). This posture is sometimes used during sleeping and grooming, but rarely used for more than 1 to 2 seconds (Wolfheim and Rowell, 1972).

Last Updated: June 4, 2007.
[Talapoin Monkey] [Morphology] [Range] [Ecology] [Locomotion] [Social Behavior] [Vocal Communication] [Olfactory Communication] [Visual Communication] [Tactile Communication] [Reproduction] [References] [The Primata] [Primate Evolution] [Primate Taxonomy] [Primate Conservation] [Primate Fact Sheets] [Primate Definitions] [Primate Store] [Miopithecus Links]